“Architecture is the will of an epoch translated into space.” -Ludwig Mies van der Rohe

“Architecture is the will of an epoch translated into space.” -Ludwig Mies van der Rohe

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Saint Peter’s Basilica, Vatican City, Rome, Italy. Principal design by: Michelangelo, Donato Bramante, Carlo Maderno and Gian Lorenzo Bernini.

~Ana Livingston, Fine Artist & Muralist

 

 

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“The Art of a People is a True Mirror to Their Minds.”

“The art of a people is a true mirror to their minds.” -Jawaharlal Nehru

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The School of Athens by Raphael, 1510-1511, painted during the High Renaissance, Italy

~Ana

 

“Art is the Signature of Civilizations.” -Beverly Sills

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The glorious Uffizi Gallery in Florence, Italy.

~Ana

“Chat with a Dead Man” – Excerpt From the Short Story by Ana Livingston

“His name was Guido. I‘d been enjoying a crisp, spring morning at my favorite outdoor cafe in the Montepuliano outskirts when he arrived. By “arrived” I mean one moment I was alone, and the next I wasn’t. I’d stolen a quick moment to study him as he settled on a stool across from me and estimated his age to be about 55; he soon confirmed that fact.

“Well,” he said, “At least I had been…right before my death.” And so the tale of his ending begins with a chat over the too dark and much too rich morning coffee I shouldn’t have been drinking.

“It’s funny how when one conducts their life responsibly for a short period of time they feel they deserve to be rewarded with the very thing that should be avoided like the plague. As my personal testament to that fact, when I was cheerfully dressing that morning my internal dialog went something like this…”

<stay tuned for the next installment!>

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Beautiful Montepulciano, Italy. Opening for the short story by Ana Livingston titled “Chat With a Dead Man”.

Excerpt: Copyright © 2015 by Ana Livingston. All rights reserved.

www.analivingstonfineartist.com

Carnevale di Venezia! (Carnival of Venice) – A Short History

It has been said that the first documented use of masks in Venice dates back to the 13th century. In subsequent years, Carnevale evolved into a mass celebration where, being anonymous, one was not judged by their social standing. The result was that all classes could freely and joyously interact.

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Photography source unknown

Masks were later banned in the 1930’s under the ruling Fascist party, but Carnevale was given the breath of life four decades later by a group of local artisans in the late 1970’s.

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Photography source unknown

The Italian government quickly fell in step and now showcases this vibrant and very popular festival each year.

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Photography source unknown

One of the most prized awards during the carnival is “the most beautiful mask” or la maschera più bella.

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Carnevale di Venezia is one of the top festivals world-wide, drawing up to an estimated 100,000 participants and spectators each year.

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Ciao for now, Venezia! I will see you next year!

~Ana